The 9 P’s are a framework that encompasses all the individual domains that most ecommerce businesses have. Whilst they do not operate in isolation, they can be viewed as discrete activities, with their own level of expertise and best practice.

Platform: choosing your ecommerce technology platform. The choices here are whether to build a custom platform or choose from the myriad of hosted platforms with inbuilt functionality.

  1. Platform: choosing your ecommerce technology platform. The choices here are whether to build a custom platform or choose from the myriad of hosted platforms with inbuilt functionality.
  2. Project: ecommerce platforms create projects with implementation processes for both initial set-up and for adding new functionality during normal day-to-day business. There are a set of standard best practices for project delivery.
  3. Partner: ecommerce platforms and projects are often managed by an external partner who manages the programme or project delivery. Selecting and engaging with external parties can drive the success or failure of any ecommerce project.
  4. Payments: methods of accepting payments on ecommerce sites have both increased in number and become much easier to implement. The increase in the number of choices has driven new best practice models.
  5. Performance: platform and technology require performance management once rolled out. Optimising availability, page speed, user experience and trading requirements are part and parcel of best practice.
  6. Profile and Personas: customer profiles identify who the target ecommerce customers are. The persona is a composite representation of the most important customer segments. Collecting, analysing, aggregating, and organising profiles and personas are based on quantitative sources and qualitative sources, with corresponding best practices.
  7. Products: the ‘digital shelf’ has resulted in a set of best practices for product choice, ranges, product data, how those products are searched and browsed for and how they are displayed on site.
  8. Propositions: the customer value proposition for buying online defines why customers visit, stay and return. The proposition is communicated through a mixture of content, convenience and choice.
  9. People: staff requirements in ecommerce break down into four core areas: strategy, management, technology and ‘business as usual’. These people requirements, structures and roles change depending on the size of the business, and best practice vary as a result.